The Salazar Bunker: Deep in the Jungle

Esperanto Dharma LogoDeep in the jungle of the Salazar Rain Forest, there lay a primitive-looking village. Long ago abandoned, the village was just a front. Inside the most beaten and broken-down hut, there was a staircase. It led down deep, almost ten stories. At the bottom was a secret bunker.

The bunker housed an extensive laboratory complex that looked like it was excavated in the chilliest days of the Cold War. An airlock at the bottom of the stairs had perfectly preserved it from the jungle above. I couldn’t figure out who built it, and even looking around, it was hard to read into it. Signs in Russian covered with signs in English and Portuguese. Parts of the complex had signs in Chinese and even Esperanto, though I wondered if those were made to confuse people like me.

The bunker had a lot of clues to its many purposes, but there was no one around to ask. Deep in the shadows of the Salazar, I didn’t expect to see vibrant signs of life. But I thought there would be someone there — someone to answer my myriad questions. Instead there was only jungle, and the ruins of a rambling underground complex.

Part II

This is the first part a story I was writing, in the style of the TV show “Lost”. Click here to read Part II.

Steve Lovelace

Steve Lovelace is a writer, photographer and graphic artist. After graduating Michigan State University in 2004, he taught Spanish in Samoa before moving to Dallas, Texas. He blogs every Monday, Wednesday and Friday at http://steve-lovelace.com.

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1 Response

  1. April 19, 2013

    […] don’t expect a bunker to be inviting, but this place was darker and gloomier than I expected. It wasn’t the kind of […]

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