FreeCell and Other Types of Solitaire

FreeCell Solitaire IconI cheat at Solitaire. All the time, in fact. My game of choice is FreeCell, and I like it because (virtually) every game is winnable. Knowing that I can win makes me play differently. I start using Ctrl-Z to undo my actions when I get stuck. The Windows 7 version that I play has an unlimited amount of undoes, so I can sit there and play the game using trial and error.

Puzzles vs. Games

I have no reservations about cheating at FreeCell, because I view Solitaire as more of a puzzle than a game. When you’re doing a puzzle, you’re expected to make mistakes. You can try to smush two jigsaw puzzle pieces together and see if they fit. You can pencil a word into a crossword and see if it works. And with FreeCell, you can go back and forth, making sure you don’t get stuck. It might not work in a competitive setting, but if you’re just looking to exercise your mind, it’s a fun little diversion.

Other Types of Solitaire

I’ve played other types of Solitaire, but I still like FreeCell the best. Spider Solitaire is pretty fun, too, though it has a penalty for undoes. I went through a phase where that was my game of choice. I’m not a big fan of Klondike, though, the classic game that Windows simply calls “Solitaire”. As for Hearts, I never got into it at all. To me, FreeCell is where it’s at.

What’s your favorite Solitaire game? Let me know in the comment section.

Steve Lovelace

Steve Lovelace is a writer, photographer and graphic artist. After graduating Michigan State University in 2004, he taught Spanish in Samoa before moving to Dallas, Texas. He blogs every Monday, Wednesday and Friday at http://steve-lovelace.com.

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4 Responses

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    […] Windows 3.x and OS/2. These later icons were in color, as were the card designs she created for Windows Solitaire. Susan Kare’s work has continued to evolve with computer technology. In recent years, she […]

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    […] 6), Microsoft had stopped innovating. They considered IE to be just another part of the OS, like Solitaire. A couple of years of stagnation followed, but as the Web grew and changed, a new product would […]

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